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Recipes Every College Student Should Know

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Hardcover
$10.99 US
3.77"W x 6.03"H x 0.67"D   | 6 oz | 72 per carton
On sale Mar 28, 2017 | 144 Pages | 978-1-59474-954-4
A perfect gift for hungry dorm-dwellers, this must-have pocket guide will help students make and eat healthy snacks, meals, and other tasty bites.

Discover quick breakfasts to help you make it to class on time, backpack-friendly lunches, dormmate dinners for a crowd, study break snacks, and of course an infallible recipe for microwave mug cake—plus basic tools, terms, nutrition, budgeting guides, and safety tips for novice cooks. No matter if you’ve got a microwave and an electric kettle or a full-sized kitchen, this book will have you well-fed and back to studying (or video games) in no time. Recipes include:

   • Breakfast Burritos
   • Hummus and Veggie Wraps
   • Healthy Avocado and Sunflower Seed Sandwich
   • Bacon: Microwaved or Panfried
   • Chocolate-Covered Popcorn
   • And more!
Named one of Women’s Health’s Best Gifts For College Students

“The perfect guide for any dorm-dweller to learn simple and healthy recipes that will not only satisfy but also save both time and money.”—POPSUGAR

“Got a college student? Or just a kid who with some kitchen curiosity? Recipes Every College Student Should Know, which is perhaps the world’s smallest cookbook, can get them started. Although it measures just 4-by-6-inches, it’s akin to Cooking 101.”—The Virginian-Pilot 

“This book goes far beyond ramen noodles, so don't be fooled by the cover!”— Buzzfeed

“Nelson’s tome gets down to the basics.”The Star-Ledger

“With this book on hand, they'll quickly learn how to fend for - and feed - themselves something other than ramen.”First For Women

“No bigger than your hand but can teach you tons of useful things about cooking.”College Magazine

“Step aside instant ramen and overpriced coffee! Within these pages, homemade iconic college staples are at your fingertips.”The Young Folks

“This is, by far, the best guide for college students to learn to cook I’ve ever seen. It is clear, interesting, and has tasty, filling, healthy recipes.”—Dr. Jessie Voigts, Wandering Educators

“Nelson delivers some core pieces of wisdom about cooking in college”—Publishers Weekly
Christine Nelson is a writer, cook, and accountant in Clayton, New Jersey. She has four college-age sons who routinely call her for advice at dinnertime.
Introduction
After years of dreaming about going away to college, you're finally ready. But the questions seem endless. What classes should I take? Should I join a fraternity/sorority? How will I get all this homework done? Should I learn how to cook?
 
Yes, you should! Learning to cook offers:
 
1. Choice. After years of other people making all the decisions, now it's your turn. You decide what to eat.
 
2. Control. You've probably heard horror stories about the Freshman 15—the pounds a first-year gains. Cooking your own meals gives you control over portions and ingredients.
 
3. Knowledge. That's why you're in college! Even if you forget calculus or Spanish the day after graduation, you will always need to eat. Preparing appetizing, healthy, low-cost meals is a skill you will use for years to come.

4. Satisfaction.
It's one in the morning, all the stores are closed, and you want a snack. Good thing you can make chocolate-covered popcorn!
 
This little book will help get you started with step-by-step recipes, recommended tools, and some kitchen-safety basics. There are meal ideas for a group of friends and quick breakfasts to make before class. This information may not help you pass your history midterm, but it will allow you to eat well while studying for it.
 
The Basics
 
Cooking doesn't need to be complicated. The simple recipes in this book will give you the nourishing food you need to make it through the school year, this page explain the terms you'll need to know. And following these 10 tips will allow you to at least look like you know what you're doing.
 
1. Buy fresh ingredients. Read the sell-by dates on dairy, meats, and packaged foods. Look for fruits and vegetables that are not wilted or punctured.
 
2. Beware of convenience foods. Anything already washed, cut up, bagged, or canned may save time, but they're more expensive than whole foods.
 
3. Read the recipe through. Many a home cook has been thwarted by an unexpected instruction to "marinate overnight."
 
4. Don't thaw food on the counter. Ever. (See Safety First!)
 
5. Follow directions. Don't just throw all the ingredients together. It won't end well.

6. Start clean.
Wash your cooking area as well as your hands.

7. Assemble everything before you start.
You don't want to be in the middle of a recipe when you realize that your roommate drank all the milk.
 
8. Measure first. Peel, chop, measure—whatever it takes to match the ingredients list. Cooking will go more smoothly.
 
9. Preheat. Set the oven to the correct temperature before you start cooking. It will be ready when you are.
 
10. Clean as you go. Post-meal dishes are far more overwhelming than mid-cooking dishes.

About

A perfect gift for hungry dorm-dwellers, this must-have pocket guide will help students make and eat healthy snacks, meals, and other tasty bites.

Discover quick breakfasts to help you make it to class on time, backpack-friendly lunches, dormmate dinners for a crowd, study break snacks, and of course an infallible recipe for microwave mug cake—plus basic tools, terms, nutrition, budgeting guides, and safety tips for novice cooks. No matter if you’ve got a microwave and an electric kettle or a full-sized kitchen, this book will have you well-fed and back to studying (or video games) in no time. Recipes include:

   • Breakfast Burritos
   • Hummus and Veggie Wraps
   • Healthy Avocado and Sunflower Seed Sandwich
   • Bacon: Microwaved or Panfried
   • Chocolate-Covered Popcorn
   • And more!

Praise

Named one of Women’s Health’s Best Gifts For College Students

“The perfect guide for any dorm-dweller to learn simple and healthy recipes that will not only satisfy but also save both time and money.”—POPSUGAR

“Got a college student? Or just a kid who with some kitchen curiosity? Recipes Every College Student Should Know, which is perhaps the world’s smallest cookbook, can get them started. Although it measures just 4-by-6-inches, it’s akin to Cooking 101.”—The Virginian-Pilot 

“This book goes far beyond ramen noodles, so don't be fooled by the cover!”— Buzzfeed

“Nelson’s tome gets down to the basics.”The Star-Ledger

“With this book on hand, they'll quickly learn how to fend for - and feed - themselves something other than ramen.”First For Women

“No bigger than your hand but can teach you tons of useful things about cooking.”College Magazine

“Step aside instant ramen and overpriced coffee! Within these pages, homemade iconic college staples are at your fingertips.”The Young Folks

“This is, by far, the best guide for college students to learn to cook I’ve ever seen. It is clear, interesting, and has tasty, filling, healthy recipes.”—Dr. Jessie Voigts, Wandering Educators

“Nelson delivers some core pieces of wisdom about cooking in college”—Publishers Weekly

Author

Christine Nelson is a writer, cook, and accountant in Clayton, New Jersey. She has four college-age sons who routinely call her for advice at dinnertime.

Excerpt

Introduction
After years of dreaming about going away to college, you're finally ready. But the questions seem endless. What classes should I take? Should I join a fraternity/sorority? How will I get all this homework done? Should I learn how to cook?
 
Yes, you should! Learning to cook offers:
 
1. Choice. After years of other people making all the decisions, now it's your turn. You decide what to eat.
 
2. Control. You've probably heard horror stories about the Freshman 15—the pounds a first-year gains. Cooking your own meals gives you control over portions and ingredients.
 
3. Knowledge. That's why you're in college! Even if you forget calculus or Spanish the day after graduation, you will always need to eat. Preparing appetizing, healthy, low-cost meals is a skill you will use for years to come.

4. Satisfaction.
It's one in the morning, all the stores are closed, and you want a snack. Good thing you can make chocolate-covered popcorn!
 
This little book will help get you started with step-by-step recipes, recommended tools, and some kitchen-safety basics. There are meal ideas for a group of friends and quick breakfasts to make before class. This information may not help you pass your history midterm, but it will allow you to eat well while studying for it.
 
The Basics
 
Cooking doesn't need to be complicated. The simple recipes in this book will give you the nourishing food you need to make it through the school year, this page explain the terms you'll need to know. And following these 10 tips will allow you to at least look like you know what you're doing.
 
1. Buy fresh ingredients. Read the sell-by dates on dairy, meats, and packaged foods. Look for fruits and vegetables that are not wilted or punctured.
 
2. Beware of convenience foods. Anything already washed, cut up, bagged, or canned may save time, but they're more expensive than whole foods.
 
3. Read the recipe through. Many a home cook has been thwarted by an unexpected instruction to "marinate overnight."
 
4. Don't thaw food on the counter. Ever. (See Safety First!)
 
5. Follow directions. Don't just throw all the ingredients together. It won't end well.

6. Start clean.
Wash your cooking area as well as your hands.

7. Assemble everything before you start.
You don't want to be in the middle of a recipe when you realize that your roommate drank all the milk.
 
8. Measure first. Peel, chop, measure—whatever it takes to match the ingredients list. Cooking will go more smoothly.
 
9. Preheat. Set the oven to the correct temperature before you start cooking. It will be ready when you are.
 
10. Clean as you go. Post-meal dishes are far more overwhelming than mid-cooking dishes.